TOP
logo
Bangladesh
  • icon
    Search for Air Ticket
    Search
    icon
  • icon
    Search for Hotels
    Search
    icon
  • icon
    Search for Tour Packages
    Search
    icon
  • icon
    Search for Sightseeing
    Search
    icon
  • icon
    Search for Travel Activity
    Search
    icon
icon Worldwideicon
Contact

Popular Destinations

Shilaidoho

Shilaidah has the typical enchanting natural beauty of a typical countryside of Bangladesh. The grand Padma has added to its beauty. Shilaidah was a part of the Tagore Zamindari for centuries. The old Kuthi Bari was built by the grandfather of Rabindranath Tagore. But when the river Padma threatens its existence Kuthi Bari was dismantled and another Kuthi Bari was built by Rabindranath’s grandfather Darokanath’s direction which is now a tourist attraction. It’s a three storied terraced bunglow built by brick, timber, corrugated tin sheets and Raniganj tiles most of which came from the old Kuthi Bari. It was decorated nicely and its design & decoration carried out that times cultural development.

Rabindranath Tagore spent most of is adolescences here in Shilaidah’s Kuthi Bari. When he took the responsibility of looking after the Zamindari, he came here frequently. He was very much touched by the scenic beauty of the place and that is why his most famous work is written here like: - the songs of Gitanjali, Gitimalya, Soner Tori, Chitra, Kotha O Kahini, Chokher Bali etc. To see and to feel the richness of Bengali literature one should pay a visit to Shilaidah and they will realize that why our literature is so bind up with our land, culture and people.

Bangladesh

Gajni-storage Of Nature

Can you imagine a place where all the nature’s beautiful elements stored together; if you are having difficulty to do that you can just go to Gajni and see what its looks like! Gajni is the place where you will find hills, forest, lake, fountain and array of wild life specially birds. All this natural elements makes this place nature’s love child. But the main attraction of Gajni is its picnic spot. It is sited in the middle of the forest at foot of the hills. A lake is created by building a temporary dam in the fountain stream beside the picnic spot. As the spot is within the forest and hills you will be cheered by the sweet singing of a range of singing birds. This makes the place so mesmerizing. Other than the picnic spot there are many other spots you must visit at Gajni. But as Gajni is at the very end of Bangladesh border no one is allowed to stay here after 5 pm. There is a watchtower which is 60 ft high from where you can see Meghalay and its mountains. There is also a 150 meter long tunnel down the hills and its entrance is made like a mouth of a dragon so that when you enter in the tunnel it will feel like going to a dragon’s stomach.

Bangladesh

Barishal Town

Barisal City is an old port on the Kirtankhola on the northern shore of the Bay of Bengal in southern Bangladesh. It lies in the Meghna-Padma River delta on the Kirtonkhola, an offshoot of the Arial Khan River. It is now the divisional headquarter of the Barisal. Barisal municipality was established in 1957 and was turned into a City Corporation in 2000. It is a trade centre, most notably for rice, hides, and pulses. Bakery, textile, Pharmaceutical products are output of a few industrial installation. It is linked by ship with Dhaka, about 73 miles (117 km) to the north. Chittagong to the southeast and Khulna to the southwest, Barisal is home to several government colleges, including the Sher-e-Bangla Medical College, as well as dozens of private higher-education institutions. Barisal gives its name to a curious natural phenomenon known as the Barisal guns, thundering noises heard in the delta and apparently coming from the sea. The sounds have not been satisfactorily explained but may have a seismic origin.

Bangladesh

Birishiri

If you arrange a beauty contest among the destination of Bangladesh, Shusong Durgapur of Birishiri will surely get the prize of the most photogenic natural look of all. Its scenic beauty is very unique. What makes it so charming is that the ceramic mountain, blue water of the mountain’s valley, Shomeshwari River, deserted coal mines and the green countryside.

Shusong Durgapur of Birishiri is located at Netrokona about 170 km north from Dhaka. It’s not only blessed by charismatic natural beauty, is also reach in ethnic culture as there are many ethnic groups like – Hajong, Garo, Achik and Mandi etc lives here. Many people around the world come here to learn the ethnic culture and livings.

The main attraction of Birishiri is the ceramic hill of Durgapur and the picturesque landscape along the Shomeshwari River. Except the rainy season it’s hard to find any water in the river and that’s why the river changes its landscape color with the seasons. There is also an ethnic museum at Birishiri. It’s a must place to visit while you are in Birishiri.

Birishiri is a remote place as it is situated at the Bangladesh India border. As a result all modes of transportation aren’t available here. So the best way to get in here is by road from Dhaka. The memories you will get on that trip will be unforgettable and magnetic.

Dhaka, Bangladesh

Great Mymensingh

Greater Mymensingh lies from the foot of the Garo Hills in the north down to the plains of Dhaka in the south. Along the northern frontier of the district there are many aboriginal tribes such as Garos, Hajongs and Kochis who are ethnically quite distinct from the people around them. Mymensingh has earned a notable position in Bengali literature as the birth place of rich folklores and folk songs.Visit the national park and game sanctuary at Madhupur about 160 km. from Dhaka. There are a number of reserve forests in the area with rest houses and picnic spots. World famous painter Zainul Abedin's Art Gallery at Mymensingh carries the boyhood memories of national poet Kazi Nazrul Islam.

Bangladesh

Puthia

Puthia has the largest number of historically important Hindu structures in Bangladesh. The most amazing of the village's monuments that you can tour is the Govinda Temple, erected between 1823 and 1895 by one of the maharanis of the Puthia estate. It's a large square structure crowned by a set of miniature ornamental towers. It's covered by incredibly intricate designs in terracotta depicting scenes from Hindu epics, giving the appearance of been draped by a huge red oriental carpet. The ornate Shiva Temple is an imposing and excellent example of the five-spire Hindu style of temple architecture common in northern India. The ornate temple has three tapering tiers topped by four spires. It is decorated with stone carvings and sculptural works. The village's 16-century Jagannath Temple another beautiful monument to tour. It is one of the finest examples of a hut-shaped temple: measuring only 5m (16ft) on each side; it features a single tapering tower that rises to a height of 10m (33ft). Its western facade is adorned with terracotta panels of geometric designs. It is one of the most fascinating tourist destinations in Bangladesh.

Bangladesh

Bhawal National Park

 

Bhawal National Park is truly a natural treasure. The park was established in 1974 with the main goal of protecting the park’s most important habitants. It was also designed to provide recreational opportunities for the people of Bangladesh.While it certainly cannot be described as an untouched wilderness, its forest walks, angling and lake boating make it a favourite weekend haunt with the inhabitants of Dhaka. In recent years, the forest department have created a ‘silent zone’ where music is banned, and have reintroduced peacocks, spotted deer, fishing cats and pythons.
 
The park has 220 plant species, including 43 different tree species, 19 shrubs, 3 palms, 27 grasses, 24 vines, and 104 herbs. The wildlife in the park includes 13 mammals, 9 reptiles, 5 birds and 5 amphibians. In addition the Forest Department has recently introduced peacocks, deers, pythons, and cat fish
 
 
The Bhawal National Park covers an area of some 5 022 ha. This area is home to an incredibly diverse array of flora and fauna. The area was once covered by a lush forest canopy created by Sal (Shorea robusta) trees. Unfortunately illegal deforestation has stripped the area of much of this natural vegetation – in fact only 600 km2 remains of what was once a magnificent forest. New trees and woodlands have been planted in an effort to help the forest recover, but it will most likely take many years before they are mature enough to support the incredible animal diversity that was once so common in this area. The coppice sal forest that remains is unique and it would be a truly magnificent thing if it was to once again spread out and reclaim the land. In times gone by the Bhawal National Park was renowned for housing a wonderfully exotic variety of creatures, such as leopard, elephant, clouded leopard, black panthers, tigers, peacocks and sambar deer. Unfortunately many of these animals have disappeared completely and only a few species still remain in this small strip of protected vegetation. If the vegetation was to recover sufficiently, it may be hoped that this enchanting mixture of creatures may once again inhabit the forest undergrowth.
 
Nevertheless nature lovers will not be completely disappointed. The park is home to 220 plant species, 13 mammal species, 9 reptile species, 5 amphibian species and 5 bird species. The Forest Department has already attempted to reintroduce several animal species to the area, including peacock, deer, cat fish and python. The Bhawal National Park is situated only about 40 km north of Dhaka city, which makes it the perfect getaway spot for people looking for a bit of peace and tranquility. It also has very good amenities and recreational facilities and will likely prove to be a promising eco-destination in time.
Dhaka, Bangladesh

Ramsagar National Park

 

Ramsagar National Park spreads out over an area of about sixty square kilometers, with a vast man-made water reservoir as its focal point. The area around the Ramsagar Lake is a popular picnic spot for both locals and tourists, and the abundant flora and fauna in the area enhances the peaceful sensation of being close to nature.Located in the Dinajpur District in the north-west of Bangladesh.The Park is 27.76 hectare, in size, and is built around a large water reservoir known as "Ramsagar tank" built in the 18th century by Raja Ram Nath.
 
The water reservoir was built between 1750 and 1755 to provide local inhabitants with safe drinking water. Its construction was initiated by Raja Ram Nath and some 1.5 million laborers worked on the project. The reservoir was named in his honor. The Parjatan Corporation, which manages many tourism projects in Bangladesh, has developed some visitor facilities around the lake, such as rest-rooms, picnic spots and kiosks to sell refreshments, as well as playgrounds for children to enjoy. Popular activities in the area include fishing, boating and hiking. There is not much in the line of indigenous forest in the Ramsagar National Park, but the Forest Department of Bangladesh have planted a variety of ornamental and fruit trees that have flourished and become lush forested areas.
 
 
The lake is populated by a variety of fish, as well as fresh water crocodiles, while animals that visitors are likely to see on land include Sambar Deer, Chital Deer, Wild Boar, Blue Bull, Sloth Bear and Hyena. Birding enthusiasts can look out for resident White-Breasted Water Hen, Jacanas, Moorhen, River Tern, Sand Piper, Ringed Plover and Grey and Purple Herons. Moreover, the lake is a stop-over for innumerable migratory water-fowl, making for a spectacular sight during migration season.
 
With the concept of eco-tourism gaining in popularity all over the world, the Forest Department of Bangladesh is considering a number of the country’s national parks for developing this concept, and the Ramsagar National Park is on that list. Eco-tourism allows visitors, both local and international, to enjoy the natural beauty of the country, provides local communities with a sustainable income, raises awareness of the challenges of development versus conservation, and looks for ways to ensure that future generations will also have the opportunity of enjoying the beauty of Bangladesh.
Bangladesh

Sundarbans

 

The UNESCO World Heritage Site of the Sundarbans is one of the world’s largest single areas of tidal halophytic mangrove forests. Highlighting the environmental value of the Sundarbans, it has been designated a Ramsar site, making it subject to the Ramsar Convention international treaty that promotes the conservation and sustainable utilization of crucial wetlands. The Sundarbans, literally meaning “beautiful jungle” or “beautiful forest”, lies at the mouth of the Ganges and is home to an estimated 200 Bengal Tigers and a herd of approximately 30,000 spotted deer, as well as an impressive variety of reptile, invertebrate and bird species.
 
Covering an area of 10,000 square kilometers, 6,000 square kilometers of which is in Bangladesh and the balance in West Bengal, India, the Sundarbans is a complex ecosystem intersected by a network of tidal waterways, small islands of mangrove forests and mudflats. Twenty-six of the known fifty broad mangrove types found in the world flourish in the Sundarbans. The freshwater rivers originating in the Ganges meet the saltwater tides from the Bay of Bengal, creating a unique environment supporting extensive plant and animal life. Sixty-four plant species have been recorded in the Sundarbans, and in the months of April and May the area looks as though it has been set on fire, with the flaming red leaves of the Genway and the red flowers of the Kankara, mingling with the bright yellow flowers of Khalsi. Other commonly found plants are Passur, Garjan, Goran and Sundari.
 
 
The resident Bengal Tigers get around the Sundarbans by swimming in the saline waters. These magnificent animals are considered to be an endangered species. Other mammals found in the Sundarbans include Fishing Cats, Wild Boar, Common Grey Mongoose, Macaques, Flying Fox, Chital and Pangolin. Birding enthusiasts will have plenty to see in the Sundarbans and can look out for Coots, Water Hens, Pariah Kites, Marsh Harriers, Jungle Crows, Herring Gulls, Grey Herons, Cormorants, Peregrine Falcons, Woodpeckers, Pintails, Curlews and much, much more.
 
Twenty-six of the fifty broad mangrove types found in the world grow well in the Sundarbans. The commonly identifiable vegetation that grow in the dense mangrove forests at the Sundarbans are salt water mixed forest, mangrove scrub, brackish water mixed forest, littoral forest, wet forest and wet alluvial grass forests. The Bangladesh mangrove vegetation of the Sundarbans differs greatly from other non-deltaic coastal mangrove forests and upland forests associations. Unlike the former, the Rhizophoraceae are of minor importance.
 
Creatures in and around the waters of the Sundarbans include Gangetic Dophins (endangered), Sawfish, Butter Fish, Silver Carp, Electric Rays, Star Fish, Crabs, Prawns, Shrimps, Common Toads and Tree Frogs. Reptiles include Estaurine Crocodiles (endangered), Chameleons, King Cobras, Olive Ridley Turtles (endangered), Monitor Lizards, Pythons and Chequered Killbacks.
 
 
The Sundarbans plays an important role in the economy of the southwestern region of Bangladesh as well as in the national economy. It is the single largest source of forest produce in the country. The forest provides raw materials for wood based industries. In addition to traditional forest produce like timber, fuelwood, pulpwood etc., large scale harvest of non wood forest products such as thatching materials, honey, bees-wax, fish, crustacean and mollusk resources of the forest takes place regularly. The vegetated tidal lands of the Sundarbans also function as an essential habitat, produces nutrients and purifies water. The forest also traps nutrient and sediment, acts as a storm barrier, shore stabilizer and energy storage unit. Last but not the least, the Sunderbans provides a wonderful aesthetic attraction for local and foreign tourists.
 
The only way to explore the Sundarbans is by boat, and the tourism department of Bangladesh operates luxury launches for this purpose. Alternatively, many locals offer safari tours on their private boats. Between November and February, visitors are most likely to see Bengal Tigers sunning themselves on the riverbanks. Hiron Point is excellent for spotting tigers, deer, monkeys and crocodiles, while Katka in the early morning or evening is alive with the activity of birds. There is no doubt that the Sundarbans will be appreciated by all who enjoy the wonders of nature at its best.
Bangladesh

Shaheed Minar National Monument

 

Located near the Dhaka Medical College in Dhaka, Bangladesh, the national monument known as Shaheed Minar, was established in memory of those who were killed during the 1952 Bengali Language Movement demonstrations. Set upon a fourteen foot high stage, the Shaheed Minar National Monument is constructed from columns of pure marble stone, with stairs and railings painted white and the fences on either side bearing lines of poetry penned by famous poets made out of iron letters. Two statues are placed at the entrance of the monument.The Language Movement gained momentum, and after a long struggle, Bengali was given equal status with Urdu. To commemorate the dead, the Shaheed Minar was designed and built by Hamidur Rahman, a Bangladeshi sculptor. The monument stood until the Bangladesh Liberation War in 1971, when it was demolished completely during Operation Searchlight. After Bangladesh gained independence, it was rebuilt.
 
The Bengali Language Movement was formed as a political effort to advocate the recognition of the Bengali language as one of Pakistan’s official languages. At that time Bangladesh was East Pakistan and the Government of Pakistan had declared Urdu to be the sole national language, which the Bengali-speaking majority in the area objected to. In the face of rising sectarian tensions, the government put a ban on public meetings and rallies. Defying the ban, students of the University of Dhaka, along with other political activists, organized a protest to take place on 21 February 1952. Police opened fire on the protestors, resulting in dozens of deaths.
 
 
Two days later, students erected a makeshift monument at the site of the massacre in honor of those who had lost their lives. However, this was demolished soon after by the Pakistani police force. Rather than suppressing the Language Movement, the conflict seemed to spur it on, eventually leading to Bangla being given the same status as that of Urdu.
 
Bangladeshi sculptor, Hamidur Rahman, designed and built a replacement monument, which stood until the 1971 Bangladesh Liberation War. The monument was destroyed during the infamous "Operation Searchlight", in which the Pakistan Army attempted to curb the Bengali nationalist movement of East Pakistan, resulting in many deaths. However, following the granting of independence to Bangladesh the monument was rebuilt, and today serves as an important center of cultural activities in the city of Dhaka. The Language Movement martyrs are remembered at the Shaheed Minar every year.
 
Shaheed Minar is of such importance to the people of Bangladesh, that permanent replicas of the monument have been built in other countries where large Bangladeshi communities have settled. A replica monument is situated in the Altab Ali Park in the Tower Hamlets of East London and another is found in the Westwood neighborhood of Oldham. These replicas, and the original Shaheed Minar, serve as a reminder of those who made a stand to ensure that the Bangla language be given due recognition.
 
The Language Movement was one of the formidable movements which has come up in the country of Bangladesh, thus the Central Shaheed Minar epitomizes efforts to represent the spirit of Bangladeshi nationalism and also highlight the importance of the Bengali language in the social and cultural progress of the country. As a result, the Shaheed Minar has a very significant place in the social and cultural mechanism of Bangladesh. At present, all national, mourning, cultural and other activities held each year, regarding 21 February, have been centered around the Shaheed Minar.
Dhaka, Bangladesh